Reviews

Russia’s female firebrand – a history with blank spots

The world is on fire but it’s a great time for art – thus Tate Modern’s director, Frances Morris, opening the first-ever UK show devoted to Russian artist Natalia Goncharova.

Political and constitutional crisis, the rise of populism and species […]

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From stone tablets to emojis

May 12th, 2019|culture, History, Reviews|0 Comments

It’s been calculated that globally we will be exchanging over 293 billion emails each day by the end of 2019.  And that’s not counting WhatsApp, Tweets and Facebook messages. So how did we get here?

Making your Mark, an elegant […]

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The passionate logic of Evald Ilyenkov

Finding Evald Ilyenkov is a bit of a detective story, charting the rediscovery of long-buried events and writings by a remarkable Soviet-era philosopher.

Much of his work is only now becoming available in English and other languages, as the imperative to […]

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Sleaford Mods & Liines gig review

March 12th, 2019|Music, Reviews|1 Comment

It was International Women’s Day and Liines were doing themselves proud to a big crowd, who quickly warm to this 3 piece from Manchester and for good reason. There’s a non pretentious style & substance to this band, all in […]

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Poetry as witness and engine of change

February 12th, 2019|Poetry, Reviews|0 Comments

In Birds of East London Stephen Watts invites us into “an opening onto an open field”. There is “no gate to be climbed through in my lyric” he says. And yet the brief lines that follow are truly challenging […]

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Ruskin – a man of his time and of our time

Events around the country are celebrating the bi-centenary of John Ruskin’s birth on 8 February – #Ruskin200. Thinker, campaigner, artist, scientist, educator and social critic John Ruskin was one of the most contradictory of all the famous Victorians.

He was […]

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Don McCullin’s photographic voice for the people

February 5th, 2019|Photography, Reviews, Tate|2 Comments

The photographs are stunning, of war and poverty and suffering mainly, all in black and white and accompanied in each of the ten display rooms by a revealing quote from the photographer who took them – Don McCullin.

McCullin who […]

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Unblocking the pawn

September 13th, 2018|art, Poetry, real democracy, Reviews|0 Comments

As London grows and grows and grows, once familiar nooks and crannies in the centre where poetry could flourish have been ousted by property developers. That’s the bad news.

The good news is that talented and enterprising individuals like the […]

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Videogaming – the good, the bad and the ugly

If you thought global corporations just sold stuff like trainers or phones, think again. China-based Tencent is the world’s biggest Internet-related products company with a market value of US$850 billion, making it the largest enterprise in Asia. The phenomenon […]

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The Modernist future, interrupted

This summer, Malmö’s Moderna Museet, along with its partner, the Sztuki museum in Łódź, Poland is staging a must-see show about Modernism. It brings to life two little-known Polish artists whose ideas and life were shaped by revolution and […]

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In the beginning was the mark

April 28th, 2018|art, Reviews, Tate|0 Comments

Frances Aviva Blane has been included in 60 out of 2,700 applicants as an exhibiting artist in this year’s John Moores Painting Prize, the UK’s best-known painting competition. The exhibition, a key strand of the Liverpool Biennial, will be […]

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Not really Impressionism – how France’s loss became England’s gain

If only the curators had given Impressionists in London a different name: “How some artists crossed the channel to escape from war-torn Paris with some sculptures and stunning riverscapes by Monet and Derain thrown in at the end”.

If only […]

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